$249.00

Product Description

Our boneless Murakami A5 Wagyu ribeye—sourced from rib six through twelve of the rib primal—is 14oz of bovine Valhalla.  Cuts are ¾ inch thick traditional in Japanese steak houses.   

Soon to be the worst kept secret in Japanese wagyu, Murakami A5 Wagyu flirts with the umami-rich complexity of wagyu beef from our highest-end prefectures.  Sourced from Japanese Black cattle fed on a trifecta of roughage—Koshihikari rice, straw, and hay—Murakami Wagyu is the latest in A5 indulgence.

Murakami, a coastal city in the Niigata Prefecture on the Sea of Japan, has a rich history complete with ancient castles, samurai, wealthy merchants, and skilled artisans.  And now, a growing reputation for superior husbandry evident in the intensity, complex flavors, and dense marbling of Murakami Wagyu.

What do we mean when we talk about intense flavor and “complexity” in beef?  

Imagine you’re at a party with a crazy mix of people who really hit it off.  The punch is spiked with umami.  And you can tell by the laughter, this party is one for the history books.  That’s what it’s like to eat A5 Wagyu beef.   

Learn more about A5 Wagyu in our complete guide for home cooks.

Serving Suggestions

Defrosting your Murakami A5 Wagyu Ribeye in the refrigerator for 24-48 hours is the ideal method. If you’re short on time, an ice-water bath is the next best option.  Thawing in warm or hot water will result in a costly bag of liquified fat.  

We recommend searing your Wagyu ribeye steak in a cast iron or stainless steel pan.  A5 grade fat has a melting point of approx. 75 degrees Fahrenheit.  Consequently, it’s a good idea to keep your Hibachi strip steak in the fridge or ice bath until just before you cook it.  

Those of you who have experience cooking A5 wagyu will feel comfortable searing your steak  whole and slicing it before serving.  If you’re still learning, try cutting ¾ to 1 inch wide strips and preparing them one at a time until you get a feel for your setup.  A typical portion is one to two ounces per person—about the same as a serving of pork belly, pâté, or foie gras.

Murakami A5 Wagyu Ribeye Cooking Instructions:

  • Thoroughly preheat a cast iron or stainless steel pan to medium-high heat.  Season whole or cut into ¾ to 1-inch strips.  
  • Season the meat with sea salt.  A modest sprinkle of pepper is ok, but not too much.  The idea is to enhance the flavor, not cover it up.    
  • Optional: Add a small amount of neutral oil (canola, grape seed, or safflower) or fat trimmed during prep.  However, this step isn’t vital.  The natural fat content of A5 Wagyu will prevent your strip steak from sticking to the pan. 
  • Sear on one side for three minutes.  Then sear the other side for 2-2.5 minutes.  
  • Rest for twice as long as you cook it.

Product Details

Weight: 14oz.

Cut: Ribeye (sourced from rib six through twelve of the rib primal)

Region: Murakami, Niigata Prefecture, Japan

Lineage: Japanese Black (Kuroge Washu)

Product Description

Our boneless Murakami A5 Wagyu ribeye—sourced from rib six through twelve of the rib primal—is 14oz of bovine Valhalla.  Cuts are ¾ inch thick traditional in Japanese steak houses.   

Soon to be the worst kept secret in Japanese wagyu, Murakami A5 Wagyu flirts with the umami-rich complexity of wagyu beef from our highest-end prefectures.  Sourced from Japanese Black cattle fed on a trifecta of roughage—Koshihikari rice, straw, and hay—Murakami Wagyu is the latest in A5 indulgence.

Murakami, a coastal city in the Niigata Prefecture on the Sea of Japan, has a rich history complete with ancient castles, samurai, wealthy merchants, and skilled artisans.  And now, a growing reputation for superior husbandry evident in the intensity, complex flavors, and dense marbling of Murakami Wagyu.

What do we mean when we talk about intense flavor and “complexity” in beef?  

Imagine you’re at a party with a crazy mix of people who really hit it off.  The punch is spiked with umami.  And you can tell by the laughter, this party is one for the history books.  That’s what it’s like to eat A5 Wagyu beef.   

Learn more about A5 Wagyu in our complete guide for home cooks.

Serving Suggestions

Defrosting your Murakami A5 Wagyu Ribeye in the refrigerator for 24-48 hours is the ideal method. If you’re short on time, an ice-water bath is the next best option.  Thawing in warm or hot water will result in a costly bag of liquified fat.  

We recommend searing your Wagyu ribeye steak in a cast iron or stainless steel pan.  A5 grade fat has a melting point of approx. 75 degrees Fahrenheit.  Consequently, it’s a good idea to keep your Hibachi strip steak in the fridge or ice bath until just before you cook it.  

Those of you who have experience cooking A5 wagyu will feel comfortable searing your steak  whole and slicing it before serving.  If you’re still learning, try cutting ¾ to 1 inch wide strips and preparing them one at a time until you get a feel for your setup.  A typical portion is one to two ounces per person—about the same as a serving of pork belly, pâté, or foie gras.

Murakami A5 Wagyu Ribeye Cooking Instructions:

  • Thoroughly preheat a cast iron or stainless steel pan to medium-high heat.  Season whole or cut into ¾ to 1-inch strips.  
  • Season the meat with sea salt.  A modest sprinkle of pepper is ok, but not too much.  The idea is to enhance the flavor, not cover it up.    
  • Optional: Add a small amount of neutral oil (canola, grape seed, or safflower) or fat trimmed during prep.  However, this step isn’t vital.  The natural fat content of A5 Wagyu will prevent your strip steak from sticking to the pan. 
  • Sear on one side for three minutes.  Then sear the other side for 2-2.5 minutes.  
  • Rest for twice as long as you cook it.

Product Details

Weight: 14oz.

Cut: Ribeye (sourced from rib six through twelve of the rib primal)

Region: Murakami, Niigata Prefecture, Japan

Lineage: Japanese Black (Kuroge Washu)

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